Week 8

Discussion 1: Personal Experiences With Family Configurations
Family configurations are quite diverse. As the culture has evolved and changed, one “typical” family structure is no longer the norm. Today, the children and adolescents with whom you work might come from families that take many forms. Blended families, single-parent families, grandparents as guardians, and same-sex parents are far more common now than in the past.
To prepare:

Consider how family configurations have evolved from years past.
Consider the family configurations in your own experience and how they compare to those of your friends, extended family members, and any configurations identified in the Learning Resources, if applicable.
As you review the Learning Resources, think about how various configurations and situations affect children within a household.

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Post by Day 3:
Explain how personal experience influences assumptions one might have about family configurations. Support your post with examples from your personal experience and the Learning Resources, as applicable.
Respond by Day 5:
Respond to at least two colleagues in one of the following ways:

Reflect on and explain a similar or different experience you may have had.
Share an insight you gained from your colleague’s post.
Suggest an article to support or refute your colleague’s post.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.
Discussion 2: Assumptions About Family Configurations in Professional Settings
Most people make assumptions based on their personal experiences. These assumptions could affect your work with children and adolescents. You should be aware of your assumptions and how they may impact your interactions with children and adolescents.
To prepare:

Think about your assumptions regarding family configurations.
Consider how these assumptions could impact your work with children and adolescents.

Post by Day 4:
In child and adolescent settings, explain what assumptions people might make about different family configurations. Explain the impact those assumptions might have on the development of children and adolescents, and what impact those assumptions might have on your work with children and adolescents.
Respond by Day 7:
Respond to at least two colleagues in one of the following ways:

Take a different point of view from one of your colleagues and explain your point of view.
Share an insight you gained from your colleague’s post.
Suggest an article to support or refute your colleague’s post.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.
Readings

Breshears, D. (2011). Understanding communication between lesbian parents and their children regarding outsider discourse about family identity. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 7, 264–284.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Cain, D. S., & Combs-Orme, T. (2005). Family structure effects on parenting stress and practices in the African American family. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 33(2), 19–40.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Chase-Lansdale, P. L., Cherlin A. J., & Kiernan, K. E. (1995). The long-term effects of parental divorce on the mental health of young adults: A developmental perspective. Child Development, 66(6), 1614–1634.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Derman-Sparks, L., & Olsen Edwards, J. (2010). Anti-bias education for young children and ourselves. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Chapter 9, “Learning About Family Structures & Fairness” (pp. 112–124)

Fitzgerald, T. J. (2010). Queerspawn and their families: Psychotherapy with LGBTQ families. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Mental Health, 14(2), 155–162.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Frisco, M. L., Muller, C., & Frank, K. (2007). Parents’ union dissolution and adolescents’ school performance: Comparing methodological approaches. Journal of Marriage and Family 69(3), 721–741.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Jeynes, W. H. (2006). The impact of parental remarriage on children. Marriage & Family Review, 40(4), 75–102.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Marsh, H. W. (1990). Two-parent, stepparent, and single-parent families: Changes in achievement, attitudes, and behaviors during the last two years of high school. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(2), 327–340.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Tasker, F., & Granville, J. (2011). Children’s views of family relationships in lesbian-led families. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 7, 182–199.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g). Family configurations [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 10 minutes.

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

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